Christian ghostwriter · storytelling · writing tips

Where to Begin?

So you’re ready to write a story that will make your point, one that will help your readers to get whatever it is you’re trying to say. Now what?

There are probably as many answers to this question as there are writers—maybe even more, because some writers, like me, write different stories from different starting points. Should your story start with the characters? The setting? The plot? Or from something else altogether? Anything—and I mean anything—can trigger a story in a writer, so don’t be afraid to respond to something that inspires you.

I have at times awakened in the morning with the entire cast, setting, and plot in my mind (as I did for my novel, A Chance for Life), and I have spoken to other writers who, like me, tend to dream quite vividly and wake up with story after story just waiting to be written. (This is a good reason to keep a notepad and pen on your night table!) At any given time, I might have the cast of three or four different novels or stories running around in my head, all trying to get my attention. Sometimes it is just a character, waiting for me to find the right setting, the right plot, in which he/she will find a home. Sometimes I see something on the news to which I simply have to respond with a story.

The truth is, as a writer, I can find ideas and inspiration anywhere—and so can you. You simply need to open your imagination to the possibilities. Some of my own examples include:

  • My sci-fi short story, “Memorandum,” was inspired by the Walt Disney film, The Three Lives of Thomasina (from 1963).
  • My so-far unfinished novel, Unconditional Love, was inspired by the image of a starving dog on one of Animal Planet’s Animal Cops
  • My novella, Voices in the Night, was inspired by a scene in a seriously strange dream I had one night.
  • My novel, The Stars of Home, was inspired by a Star Trek novel I read years ago.

So if you want to write a story, and need ideas or inspiration, just look around you. Images, in particular, can provide a good jumping-off point. Flip through a magazine and find a photograph that strikes you. Ignore the caption, and make up one of your own. The starving dog in that Animal Cops episode I saw that night didn’t survive in real life, so I started to write a novel in which the dog not only survives, but she helps the emotionally troubled main character who rescues her to heal and find love.

If you’re serious about writing, do try to write at least a little every day, even if it’s only a new caption for a picture you have sitting on your desk. You might try some fan fiction—pick a favorite TV show or movie and write a scene with a new character. No, you’ll never be able to publish it, since the rights belong to the show, but it is good practice and can be fun. (I actually submitted a Star Trek: The Next Generation script once, which was a terrific waste of time, business-wise, but it was sure fun to play in the ST universe for awhile!)

Some say start with short stories and work your way up to longer pieces, but since my first fiction was a three-act play and my second was a full-length novel, that doesn’t really work for me. It was years later before I started writing short stuff for quick ghostwriting jobs.

Whatever you do, if you want to write, just start writing, and see where it takes you. Don’t expect a best-seller right out of the gate, but do keep practicing your craft. Don’t be afraid of exploring any tiny creative nugget of an idea. Let go, and let your imagination take you wherever it wants to go.  Writing can be as much of an adventure as a cross-country trip—and can take your imagination a lot farther than your car in both space and time.

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